Thursday, December 1, 2011

Corporate Responsibility

Yangshuo - a woman from the Drung minority groupImage by NekaPearl via Flickr

Leadership of the yesteryears is quite different from today’s modern leadership styles that are mainly driven by the volumes of advanced literary writings that are widely available in electronic and in print form and the technological innovation we see sweeping across the globe. Modern academia has played a great role in shaping the various leadership styles currently in use in the running of organizations driven by massive globalization. As the nature of leadership changes by day, one trend that needs to be addressed thoroughly is the great imbalance between majority and minority groups in the running of government institutions, corporations, and international organizations.

For a long time, minority groups have suffered the effects of stratification and marginalization imposed on them by majority groups wielding considerable power and influence in government and in the private sector. There is a tendency for plurality groups to feel threatened when they are excluded from power yet they don’t allow minority groups a share of power (Fearon, Kasara & Laitin, 2006).

Organizations have a responsibility to the societies that make their existence possible. Corporate social responsibility has been accelerated by changing trends in global business and the arrival of globalization. While society plays a great role in the proliferation of corporations worldwide, likewise, corporations have a responsibility to elevate the living conditions of society through the provision of education, healthcare services, environmental protection, infrastructure development, and delivery of clean water and other humanitarian services.

References

Fearon, J., Kasara, K., & Laitin, D. (2006). Ethnic minority rule and civil war onset. Stanford University. Retrieved from www.stanford.edu/~jfearon/papers/fearonkasaralaitin3.doc

Hopkins, M. (2004). Policy integration department world commission on the social dimension of globalization. International Labor Office, Geneva. Retrieved from http://www.ilo.org/legacy/english/integration/download/publicat/4_3_285_wcsdg-wp-27.pdf
Enhanced by Zemanta

No comments: